Date Archives June 2016

En Toriciya, Crows Nest

Oven Baked Truffle Cabbage: En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog Review

I’ve always had a healthy respect for Japanese chefs and their craft – there’s something about the quiet reverence that they have for each ingredient, and all their techniques are based around elegantly bringing out unique flavours and textures that naturally occurs in the food. So when I had the opportunity to pick the brain of Chef Hikeaki Fukada of En Toriciya, I was absolutely ecstatic.

…Of course, it had nothing to with the fact that he fed me dinner as well. 馃槈


The Order:

En Toriciya Degustation, $60/pp ($80/pp with matching sake):

Kingfish & Jalapeno Carpaccio
Kasujiru Vegetable Soup
Oven Baked Truffle Savoy Cabbage
Yakitori (Momo and Tsukune)
Popcorn Prawn
Charcoal Grilled Black Cod or Wagyu Steak
Sushi Moriawase (+12 to upgrade sushi)
Chefs selection of dessert (Matcha Creme Br没l茅e and Adzuki Custard)


The Food:

Holy. Smokes.

I was not prepared for this. I walked into En Toriciya expecting a smart casual dining restaurant, only to be presented with a close-to-fine dining experience. The only thing missing was the lack of pretentiousness, which I was very happy to do without. I was also informed that Chef Fukuda was also a sake sommalier, and our dinner would be matched with different sakes of his choosing.

I was certainly not expecting the sheer education I was about to receive.

Kingfish and Jalape帽o Carpaccio: En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog ReviewKingfish and Jalape帽o Carpaccio

We started with a very simple Kingfish and Jalape帽o Carpaccio – thin slices of kingfish were dressed lightly and topped with a small dab of what looked like jalape帽o pur茅e. Very refreshing, and just enough to whet the appetite. I was quite surprised by the Danemon sake that came with it – the richness was meant to bring out the flavour of the kingfish, but for my palate, it was oddly heavy to start the meal with. Still, an interesting choice.

Kasujiru Vegetable Soup: En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog ReviewKasujiru Vegetable Soup

Then we moved on to the Oven baked Truffle Savoy Cabbage and Kasujiru vegetable soup. It is here I learnt that if it looks like miso, and smells like miso…well sometimes it’s not miso. Chef Fukuda shows us just how passionate he is about sake…by using the lees (sakekasu – residual by products from making sake) to thicken and flavour the soup. No waste!

Oven Baked Truffle Cabbage: En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog ReviewOven Baked Truffle Savoy Cabbage

The Oven Baked Truffle Savoy Cabbage was so magnificent that I wondered if he was going to peak too early. With humble beginnings as a staff meal (where chefs are forced into ingenuity to make delicious meals for the restaurant staff out of whatever ingredients they have on hand) this cabbage dish has risen into such magnificence it should be called Daenerys. A soft truffle aroma laces through the robust char on the cabbage, which is then balanced by a tangy salty-sweet dressing.

This course was had with Asabiraki sake from the Iwate prefecture, which I’m told is famous for their rice. Fitting, then, that a complex sake plays a supporting role to such complex food. There is a typically Japanese sense of balance at play, and I’m loving every minute of it.

Tsukune (Yakitori): En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog ReviewTsukune (Yakitori)

Chicken Thigh (Yakitori): En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog ReviewChicken Thigh (Yakitori)

Next course: yakitori. Literally translating to “barbecued chicken”, we get two types for dinner – tsukune (chicken meatballs) and momo (chicken thigh). All fairly simply prepared – salt, smoke, and in the case of the tsukune, a light brush of glaze. Chef Fukuda tells me that he uses binchotan instead of regular coals – these Japanese “smokeless” coals hold the heat longer and more steadily, producing a better dish.

Popcorn Prawn: En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog ReviewPopcorn Prawn

The Popcorn Prawn follows, and although it’s a fun dish topped with generous lashings of mayonnaise (oh Mayo, how I love thee), it wasn’t quite as finessed as the other dishes seemed to be. Some bits of the batter were a touch underdone and a bit gluey at the end of the mouthful, which I noticed only because the standard of his other dishes were so high to begin with.

Charcoal Grilled Black Cod: En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog ReviewCharcoal Grilled Black Cod

We then moved right back up the scale, though, with Charcoal Grilled Black Cod and Wagyu Steak. I’m not entirely sure whether you’d usually have to pick one or the other for your degustation, but I know my life is much better for having tried the both of them. The Charcoal Grilled Black Cod was appropriately dark from the smoke and Saiky艒dzuke, a miso-like paste made by fermenting sake lees (At this point, Chef Fukuda is starting to look more and more like a man obsessed…something which I wholeheartedly appreciate), whilst still keeping the soft silky flesh that makes this my favourite way to have my favourite fish of all time.

Wagyu Beef Steak: En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog ReviewWagyu Steak

The Wagyu Steak was no slack either – medium rare pieces of tender steak were topped with moromiso, which is a chunky miso condiment. Rich/salty/sweet bites had pieces of cucumber to cut it, and it was over all too soon.

Selection of sushi: En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog ReviewSelection of sushi: Otoro

And when you think you can’t eat any more, out comes the plate of luxurious sushi. Sea urchin, fatty tuna belly, and engawa (flounder fin – a recent obsession I picked up from my trip to Japan) were one of many pieces that lined the plate. Simple, and yet such a perfect way to end the savoury courses. And it didn’t even matter that I was fairly full: I always have space for sushi.

At this point, we were treated to Daikoshu, a sake that actually HAD THE WARM HONEY NOTES OF WHISKY. Mind blown. This super aged sake (no joke, Daikoshu translates to “very old booze”) was older than I am, and defied all my previous Riesling-like experiences with sake. Where it was usually fresh and dry, this was voluptuous and almost caramel – like in its dark sweet notes. Very delicious, and an absolute eye opener.

Matcha Creme Br没l茅e: En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog ReviewMatcha Creme Br没l茅e

Adzuki Custard: En Toriciya, Crows Nest. Sydney Food Blog ReviewAdzuki Custard

Fitting, then, that we should sip it right before dessert. A Matcha Creme Br没l茅e and Adzuki Custard completed our meal, both with silky creamy textures and a sweet finish that wasn’t too cloying. With all the big hits through the evening, the dessert course didn’t exactly reinvent the wheel, but then again, I’d be asking for too much if I was expecting it from En Toriciya. A stellar performance: one I’m hoping to repeat.


The Service:

It’s not often that a restaurant’s service matches the quality of the food, but I’m very glad to report that at En Toriciya it’s a FULL experience. There was one waiter that really REALLY knew his shit. There was no question that we could throw at him that he couldn’t answer, and he only lacked a small nuance in detail compared to Chef Fukuda’s answers. Service that parallels the level of what I’ve had at Tetsuya’s, but in a much more comfortable setting. Love it.


Value for money:

At $60 per head for the degustation experience at En Toriciya, I think that you get more than your money’s worth. I was positively rolling out the door at the end of the meal, and my mind was still buzzing with the sheer variety of food that I was treated to. Chef Fukuda clearly puts a lot of thought into curating an array of treats, and like a good story, it leaves you walking away satisfied.


The Vibe:

En Toriciya is a fine dining restaurant hiding in humble surroundings, and that can be a little jarring for some. There isn’t a clear theme to the place, and for the uninitiated, you might even mistake this for just another local eatery where you can just pick up some hearty Japanese curry and make your way home. It’s clean and charming, but I wouldn’t expect theatrics and fireworks walking in. It’s very clear that the focus at En Toriciya is on the food and drink, the way Chef Fukuda wants it to be.


And finally,

I’ve always known that Crows Nest is home to some hidden gems (I’ve been to a few, lately) but I never expected to find a diamond quite like En Toriciya. Everything about this restaurant just resonated with the chef within me – the philosophy, the food, the single-minded obsession – and somehow they manage to artfully show off without the pomp and circumstance of other eateries with half the talent.

An absolutely stunning experience, and one I’m looking forward to repeating again and again.

Insatiable Munchies dined as guests of En Toriciya and Washoku Lovers.
En Toriciya
100 Willoughby Road
Crows Nest, Sydney
Phone: (02) 9438 1738
Website: https://www.facebook.com/pages/En-Toriciya/607809672663924

En Toriciya Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

The Max Joy Co., Eastwood

The Max Joy Co., Eastwood. Sydney Food Blog Review

*This is going to be a super quick post because I鈥檝e now been here so many times that I don鈥檛 actually know what I鈥檝e ordered anymore*.

The Max Joy Co., Eastwood. Sydney Food Blog Review

The Max Joy Co. is a relatively new addition to the bustling Asian restaurants of Eastwood, is bring well, joy, in the form of ice cream to the locals. From flavours like Eastwood Granny Smith (local pride! *thumps chest*), to Houjicha, they are really melding Asian favourites in the flavour department with a certain whimsy that you鈥檇 find in the inner city.

The Max Joy Co., Eastwood. Sydney Food Blog Review

The brainchild of Max, the owner (a former business student who always wanted to enter the food industry) this little ice cream shop sits where the old Eagle Boys Pizza used to be (RIP). Bright lights and sunny stripes of blue and white shine like a beacon after a night out food-crawling through Eastwood (a common occurrence, I assure you), beckoning you with its siren song of creamy delights and true-to-form flavours.

Scoops of ice cream: The Max Joy Co., Eastwood. Sydney Food Blog Review

My most recent must-have has got to be the Fig and Pistachio. Sweet, syrupy fig notes get swirled into the rich nutty pistachio base, and hits all the right spots that keep me going back again and again.

Mochi Waffles: The Max Joy Co., Eastwood. Sydney Food Blog Review

And if you are in the mood for something a little more than ice cream? Well their selection of waffles will spark the imagination. The mochi waffle is the most interesting thing on the menu, but the pandan is my favourite by far. A warm reason to have ice cream in the middle of winter. Not that I need a reason. *ahem*.

Much love for Max and his team – I鈥檝e been in quite a few times since they鈥檝e opened (much to the detriment of my ever-expanding waistline) and they鈥檝e been consistently helpful, happy to be there, and extremely hospitable.

Oh, and did I mention that they have wall chargers for your electronics? (heart eyes emoji)

This meal was independently paid for.
The Max Joy Co.
251 Rowe St
Eastwood, NSW 2122
Phone:+61 2 8084 3234
Website: https://www.facebook.com/themaxjoyco

The Max Joy Co. Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Manoosh Pizzeria, Enmore

Vegan Wonder: Manoosh Pizzeria, Enmore. Sydney Food Blog Review

What IS pizza, anyway? I mean, the term historically belongs to the Italians, who have made it more a philosophy involving woodfired flatbread, sweet tomatoes, and sun drenched afternoons with wine. But in more modern times, the term has been somewhat bastardised (like Jon Snow!) to mean any sort of flat bread, usually with a sauce and cheese.

Which brings us to Manoosh Pizzeria: located in Enmore, this takeaway-style shop specialises in Lebanese style pizzas, and even offers up something for vegans – not something you see too often at a pizza shop.


The Order:

Vegan wonder
Pizza topped with vegan chorizo, vegan cheese, greens and served with a side of lemon

Beef deluxe, $8
Beef fillets,grilled onions,melted cheese,fresh tomato,lettuce and pickles topped with mustard mayo then wrapped up

Zaatar Deluxe Style, $8
Zaatar cooked with cheese,pepperoni and chilli flakes then wrapped up with fresh tomato,capsicum,olives and onions.

Halawa, $7.50
A delicious blend of halawa (sweet tahini), pistachios & banana enclosed in puff pastry


The Food:

What really drew me to Manoosh Pizzeria to begin with was that they had completely vegan options on the menu. No, I’m not abandoning my ‘hedonistic’ meat-loving lifestyle, but my acquisition of vegan friends suddenly has given me an awareness of how hard it is to find vegan options outside of suburbs like Bondi.

Vegan Wonder: Manoosh Pizzeria, Enmore. Sydney Food Blog ReviewVegan Wonder

We tried the Vegan Wonder (sounds like it should be a new Marvel movie!) with greens, vegan chorizo and vegan cheese. Charlie, the owner, tells me that he usually uses a vegan mozzarella for ultimate melty goodness, but due to *ahem* supply issues, he鈥檚 using a vegan cheddar instead. The thing is, either way, the Vegan Wonder makes for a good bite. In the words of Simon, 鈥淓ating it doesn鈥檛 make me angry鈥. There were some good flavours in there, and everything worked well in harmony. BUT it was just missing a little bit texturally. The vegan chorizo had an odd spongy texture to it – not unlike a typical fish cake you would find in asian dishes – which throws me off because my mind was expecting, well, chorizo. The cheese, as well, was lacking a melty oozy quality that you look forward to when you have cheese.

Good try, but I wouldn鈥檛 particularly order it unless I was vegan.

On the meatier front – the Beef Deluxe was like a cheese burger masquerading in wrap form. (Man, we鈥檝e got a real superhero theme going on here) The mustard mayo, beef, pickles, fresh tomato and melted cheese gets wrapped in Lebanese bread, for a juicy, filling lunch. In fact, a touch too juicy for my liking, but I鈥檝e always liked my beef with a good charred flavour anyway, which is hard to get with a slow-cooked pulled meat.

If you were leaning towards a wrap, though, I would strongly recommend the Zaatar deluxe. The salty spicy hit of the pepperoni and chilli flakes are balanced by the cheese and fresh tomato, and the capsicum, olives and onion just complete a moreish mouthful that keeps you coming back for more. Very satisfying, but not quite as 鈥渘aughty鈥 tasting as say, a late night kebab wrap after a night out.

A lunch version, perhaps, that doesn鈥檛 make you too heavy to carry on with your day.

Halwa, $7.50: Manoosh Pizzeria, Enmore. Sydney Food Blog ReviewHalwa, $7.50

The Halawa actually took me by complete surprise. Pizza places aren鈥檛 exactly鈥nown for their desserts, and I wasn鈥檛 expecting Manoosh Pizzeria to be much different. Boy, was I wrong. A crispy puff pastry parcel enclosed a middle-eastern sweet tahini paste, banana and pistachio for a super rich end to your meal. This is the kind of dessert that has to be eaten piping hot, and makes you go 鈥淵AAASSSSSS鈥.

Halwa, $7.50: Manoosh Pizzeria, Enmore. Sydney Food Blog Review

Yes.


The Service:

As with Ho Jiak, it’s hard to speak of table service when you order and pay at the counter. The staff are young, but seem slightly more interested in the work than, say, teenagers at McDonald鈥檚. I also had the pleasure of being looked after by Charlie, the owner, which would make my experience fairly different from the average punter.

I will say this, though. They DO have tables for you to eat in, as well as water for the table, which gives Manoosh Pizzeria a few more brownie points over the average takeaway-style pizza shop.


Value for money:

You can get fairly well-fed for below $10. which is a pretty good deal this close to the city. It would be a viable option if I was a Uni student in the area, and that鈥檚 my ultimate litmus test.

Not super-amazing, but definitely good value.


The Vibe:

Manoosh Pizzeria doesn鈥檛 strike me as a particularly 鈥渄esigned鈥 experience – there鈥檚 a functionality in the fluorescent lights and plain space that is efficient in a 鈥済et in and get out鈥 sort of way. Certainly not somewhere that you鈥檇 look to have a leisurely catchup lunch at, but something tells me that it wasn鈥檛 what they were aiming for anyway.


And finally,

So we鈥檝e come back to the question: what IS pizza? In this case, it鈥檚 a fairly relaxed definition, a tribute to the 鈥渟he鈥檒l be alright鈥 value that Australia holds so dear. 鈥淧izza鈥, it seems, is used as a gentle introduction to the concept of Man鈥檕ushe – a lebanese flatbread traditionally topped with za鈥檃tar and olive oil. Toppings such as cheese follow – because everything is made better with cheese – and the rest, as they say, is history.

On the whole, Manoosh Pizzeria, for me, sits somewhat in the middle of the heap. They鈥檙e not reaching for the cult foodie status as, say, Hartsyard, but they don鈥檛 seem to just be there to make a quick buck off party-goers too drunk to recognise whether the food is good or bad. The vegan option is a nice addition – and even though I鈥檓 not a person who understands why you would try an substitute something like meat (just eat something else that鈥檚 delicious in its own right, right?!), I can appreciate that this is still a viable option for vegan friends.

I鈥檇 definitely consider going to Manoosh Pizzeria if I was in the area, but I鈥檓 not sure I鈥檇 make a special trip out.

Insatiable Munchies dined as guests of Manoosh Pizzeria.
Manoosh Pizzeria
170 Enmore Rd
Enmore NSW 2042
Phone: +61 2 9550 6606
Website: www.manoosh.com.au/

Manoosh Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Ho Jiak, Strathfield

Nasi Goreng with Musang King Durian (Special): Ho Jiak, Strathfield. Sydney Food Blog Review

There are just some times when a simple “yum” isn’t enough to describe just how awesome the food is, which is why in Singapore and Malaysia, we have another phrase: “Ho Jiak” translates to “Good Eats”, and it’s usually applied to situations where the food, surroundings, weather, moon and stars align to give you a sublimely delicious experience.

Sometimes we may also apply the use of it’s more powerful cousin: “shiok”.

Either way, I think you’ve gotta be pretty confident to plaster it all over the front door as the name of your restaurant, like Ho Jiak have done in their unassuming space in Strathfield Plaza.


The Order:

Indomie Goreng Lobster (Special)

Nasi Goreng with Musang King Durian (Special)

Nasi Pattaya (with added fried chicken), $15.80
Malaysian fried rice placed inside an omelette

Grandfather’s congee, $12.80
Homemade chicken congee, served with fresh herbs

Sambal Kangkung, $12.80

Roti Kaya, $8.80


The Food:

Southeast Asian food is like My Fair Lady to me (warning: musical nerdness ahead): it’s rough, unpolished and charming, with the option of being elevated to great heights. At Ho Jiak, the food is definitely charming, bringing forth a blast from the past that would make Marty McFly proud.

Ho Jiak, Strathfield. Sydney Food Blog Review

The Grandfather’s Congee came with a strong recommendation, and it ticked quite a few boxes for me. Shredded poached chicken, peanuts, chilli, and a generous lashing of julienned ginger brought me right back to Saturday mornings growing up where my mother used to cook up a homely Saturday lunch for when my dad came home from golf. All that was missing was pork meatballs, but to be perfectly honest, I think that was a delicious riff on my mother’s part.

Grandfather's congee, $12.80: Ho Jiak, Strathfield. Sydney Food Blog ReviewGrandfather’s congee, $12.80

Hong Kong style congee enthusiasts might get a rude shock, however: the Southeast Asian style is much more watery and roughly cooked (see what I mean by “unpolished”?), and more strongly flavoured than the pure, sweet rice flavours of HK.

Nasi Pattaya (with added fried chicken), $15.80: Ho Jiak, Strathfield. Sydney Food Blog ReviewNasi Pattaya (with added fried chicken), $15.80

The Nasi Pattaya is basically a Nasi goreng (fried rice) served in an omelette package for that “wow” factor. The rice was decently flavoured, and the egg was tender, but there wasn’t any particular pizzazz that triggered memories for me. And as someone who has grown up in Singapore, I’ve eaten many a Nasi Pattaya, so this one should have been a clear hair-trigger.

Passable, but nothing to write home about.

Indomie Goreng Lobster (Special): Ho Jiak, Strathfield. Sydney Food Blog ReviewIndomie Goreng Lobster (Special)

Nasi Goreng with Musang King Durian (Special): Ho Jiak, Strathfield. Sydney Food Blog ReviewNasi Goreng with Musang King Durian (Special)

If you’re feeling adventurous, you can order the Indomie Goreng Lobster and the Nasi Goreng with Musang King Durian from their specials board. Yes, you didn’t read it wrongly: there is a fried rice on there with DURIAN.

The Nasi Goreng with Musang King Durian was the same fried rice base as the Nasi Pattaya, but this time, with a durian sambal and actual durian pieces on the side. The sweet, custard-like durian flesh in a chilli application can be a bit jarring for some, but it has the potential to be SO GOOD, like a durian sambal cuttlefish dish of Jackie M’s that I had one time. This one was a touch short of the mark: the durian sambal tasted like a straight mix of durian and chilli, missing the earthy notes that I usually love in any sambal – onion, garlic, shellfish etc. The fresh durian on the side was okay, too, although with an average rice and average sambal there wasn’t much it could do to elevate the dish.

The Indomie Goreng Lobster, on the other hand, was curiously addictive. Many eateries in Southeast Asia utilise convenience products like instant noodles as a basis for quick street-style food, and I thought it was fairly accurate here. Sweet, salty, and dark with all the types of soy available, this too triggered all sorts of memories of my childhood. A touch oilier than I’d like, personally, but I can’t say that it’s not authentic. 馃槈

The “lobster” bit to the name, however, was a bit of a misnomer. Sure, there were pieces floating through it, but I’m not sure that it wouldn’t have been served better with more visible pieces of prawn instead. Why push a “luxury” ingredient when you don’t have to?

Sambal Kangkung, $12.80: Ho Jiak, Strathfield. Sydney Food Blog ReviewSambal Kangkung, $12.80

On the other end of the spectrum, a Sambal Kangkung is the most common, basic, “peasant”, everyday dish you can order. But therein lies the skill: because there’s so little to the dish – Sambal (chilli paste) and Kangkung (Chinese water spinach) – it’s hard to get right and easy to get wrong. Here, I have to commend Ho Jiak on the cleanliness of their spinach (you’d be surprised at how many gritty kangkung dishes I’ve eaten), and the dish was true to form with what you’d find in an average Asian eatery. The sambal could have a richer depth of flavour and the Kangkung stems could be less wilted, but as it stands, a perfectly acceptable take on a staple.

Roti Kaya, $8.80: Ho Jiak, Strathfield. Sydney Food Blog ReviewRoti Kaya, $8.80

And finally, “dessert”. Only in Asia can something like Roti serve as both an accompaniment to curry, and a dessert food all at once. I highly doubt that the Roti here is house made, however, and it’s such a shame because the competition is the likes of Mamak, and, well, we all know about the soft, tissue-like roti at Mamak. Not quite the tender chewiness that I’ve come to love about Roti, but a pretty standard menu item that you’d find back home nonetheless.


The Service:

There isn’t too much service to speak of (or criticise!) since you order and pay at the counter and have your food brought out to you. I WILL say, though, that I got the sense that the staff, at the very least, believed in their own food. The lady I spoke to at the counter could easily answer my incessant food questions, and didn’t shy away from offering me more information about their food and history: for example, did you know that they used to be called Petaling Express, but decided to change their name because they were constantly confused with the well-known Petaling St?

Well now you do. You’re welcome. XD


Value for money:

As a Singaporean, it’s always been a bit hard for me to see a roughly $15-$20 price tag on what would otherwise be street food. Part of the charm of this cuisine is that it’s cheap and tasty, and maybe it’s a habit from my days as a Uni student, but the price tag is a touch “CBD” for me, especially when we aren’t quite in the city.

On the upside? The portions are positively MASSIVE, so definitely a candidate for sharing if you’re so inclined. I don’t think there was anything served up that I could comfortably finish on my own, so be prepared to bring a doggybag home if you’d like to order more than one thing off the menu!


The Vibe:

I really liked how the seemingly no-frills decor is true to form. 3-4 two-seater tables line the wall of this narrow restaurant, which also happen to be adorned with old black and white pictures. The glass that separate the cooking area from the eating area creates a fish tank-like effect, allowing patrons to watch as their food is being tossed up in massive woks. Walls of packets and bottles (containing sauces and condiments in brands I recognise from my childhood) also line the kitchen, an unabashed way of showing just how authentic the flavours are: because if you’re using the correct brands of sauces as your base, you’re halfway there.

Very cosy, and a great little trip down memory lane.


And finally,

The experience in Ho Jiak was, for the most part, fairly authentic. It wasn’t spectacular enough to be the kind of place that you’d form a queue for (or make a special trip to), but I’d totally drop by for some chilli-laced Malaysian goodness if I was already in the area. Speaking of which: The belachan! THE BELACHAN. A shrimp-laced chilli sauce that’s made in-house daily; packing a kick that brings a happy tear to my eye. (I swear it’s not the heat of the chilli getting to me.)

I wonder if they’ll start selling jars of their belachan soon. My pantry would be happy for it.

Insatiable Munchies dined as a sponsored guest of Ho Jiak. Sponsored posts are guaranteed reviews which feature honest opinions of the reviewer and their experience, and is not an advertorial.
Ho Jiak
33/11 The Boulevard
Strathfield NSW 2135
Phone:+61 2 9008 8020
Website: www.hojiak.com.au/

Ho Jiak Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato